The Silver City Museum features a series of discussions on local history

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The Silver City Museum unveils Unpacking Money, a special series of seven presentations and discussions taking place on Saturday mornings from June to August. Each lecture will focus on a theme of southwest New Mexico’s history, from its pre-colonial origins to the development of Silver City as a modern American city. Community conversation is one of the main objectives of Upacking Silver. Each presentation will be followed by an open discussion where members of the public are invited to ask questions, contribute perspectives and suggest ways to expand the project.

You can find out more about the individual lectures and presenters and register to attend at www.silvercitymuseum.org.

With support from the New Mexico Humanities Council, this series was developed by a committee of accomplished local historians who established a general framework for exploring the history of our region. These seven humanities themes address and bring together a variety of subjects:

Federal expansion and the role of government, will examine issues such as voting rights, the Silver City Municipal Land Charter, the historic expansion of the United States, politics and military history.

The West in Pop Culture and how it influences tourism, community pride, historical confusion or

comprehension. The presentation will focus on Billy the Kid, a notorious outlaw who grew up in Silver City, pursued a criminal career in southern New Mexico and Arizona, and was captured in Mesilla.

Community construction: The unique convergence of influences that destined Silver City for a long future and the city’s evolution as a colorful, distinctive and resilient entity over its first 150 years.

The economy: Examine what sustains and changes the wealth of a community, including changes caused by technological change, union / employer tensions, market demands and government influences, environmental concerns and culture.

Support and change cultural identities among various ethnic and cultural groups and how

identities change and sometimes conflict and merge with others. The presentation will focus specifically on the start of the Silver City boomtown era and what was revealed about its attendees by the 1880 census.

Health and medicine This presentation will focus on the hospitals and health care options available from the 1880s until the establishment of Hillcrest Hospital in 1937. It will also cover some of the social history and types of illnesses that people lived during this time.

Land and environment and the often conflicting tensions between preservation, conservation and use.

The presentations will last 30-45 minutes, after which the audience will be invited to participate in a moderated discussion on the topic by asking questions and sharing their own views, concerns, suggestions for the project and information with the speakers and the public.

The information gathered in this series, including public discussions, will have an even more exciting afterlife in the upcoming Silver City Museum Silver City 101 exhibit. This ambitious exhibit will do exactly what its name suggests, providing residents and guests with an introduction to the history of Silver City. The exhibition, currently still in the planning stages, will include both physical objects and photos, as well as multimedia and built environments within the museum, much of which is also available online. Silver City 101 will become a lasting exhibit at the museum and serve as a starting point for everyone to learn more about the history and culture of our region.

The Silver City Museum creates opportunities for residents and visitors to explore, understand, and celebrate the rich and diverse cultural heritage of southwestern New Mexico by collecting, preserving, researching, and interpreting the unique history of the region. It is nationally recognized thanks to its accreditation by the American Alliance of Museums.

For more information, please contact the museum at (575) 538-5921 [email protected], or visit the museum’s website: www.silvercitymuseum.org



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