Humanities – Erudit http://erudit.media/ Fri, 28 May 2021 20:04:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://erudit.media/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Humanities – Erudit http://erudit.media/ 32 32 Joe Biden’s budget increases funding for public broadcasting, arts – Deadline https://erudit.media/joe-bidens-budget-increases-funding-for-public-broadcasting-arts-deadline/ https://erudit.media/joe-bidens-budget-increases-funding-for-public-broadcasting-arts-deadline/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 19:36:00 +0000 https://erudit.media/joe-bidens-budget-increases-funding-for-public-broadcasting-arts-deadline/ Joe Biden’s $ 6 trillion budget plan, released Friday, reverses a policy of his predecessor by increasing, rather than decreasing, federal spending on the arts and public broadcasting. For four years, President Donald Trump’s White House proposed federal budgets that canceled funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the National Endowment for the Arts, and […]]]>


Joe Biden’s $ 6 trillion budget plan, released Friday, reverses a policy of his predecessor by increasing, rather than decreasing, federal spending on the arts and public broadcasting.

For four years, President Donald Trump’s White House proposed federal budgets that canceled funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. This never happened, because Congress fixed the credits and the agencies survived. But it led to a frenzied period of lobbying on Capitol Hill from advocates of the arts and other groups to ensure funding would stay in place.

Biden’s budget offers $ 201 million for the National Endowment for the Arts, up from $ 167.5 million for the current fiscal year. An additional $ 135 million has been provided as part of the US bailout to help arts agencies trying to recover from declining revenues due to the pandemic.

A White House arts advisor? Defenders see proposal hopes as Joe Biden takes action to increase funding

The White House’s budget request for the National Endowment for the Humanities was $ 177.5 million, up from $ 167.5 million for the current year. The NEH also received an additional $ 135 million as part of the US bailout.

The CPB, which provides grants and funding to public stations, would see a credit of $ 475 million, compared to $ 465 million. The public broadcasting proposal is for fiscal year 2024, as the agency follows an advanced budget process. Like other agencies, the CPB also received emergency Covid-19 funding this year, with $ 175 million for local public media stabilization funding.

Patricia Harrison, President and CEO of CPB, said in a statement that “the president’s request underscores that federal funding for public media is a vital investment – an investment that continues to deliver proven on-air value. , online and in the community. ”

Ann Ellers, NEA Acting President, said in a statement that the budget amount “reflects the importance of the creative workforce in rebuilding the national economy, especially after a period of unrest. previous”.



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Fall 2021 courses at Arizona State University to prepare students to become true citizens of the world https://erudit.media/fall-2021-courses-at-arizona-state-university-to-prepare-students-to-become-true-citizens-of-the-world/ https://erudit.media/fall-2021-courses-at-arizona-state-university-to-prepare-students-to-become-true-citizens-of-the-world/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 07:40:11 +0000 https://erudit.media/fall-2021-courses-at-arizona-state-university-to-prepare-students-to-become-true-citizens-of-the-world/ May 27, 2021 Although summer is just beginning and we still cannot travel the world due to the pandemic, that does not mean that we cannot discover and learn more about the cultural diversity of our planet. If there’s anything we’ve learned in the past year and a half, it’s that the Sun Devils are […]]]>


May 27, 2021

Although summer is just beginning and we still cannot travel the world due to the pandemic, that does not mean that we cannot discover and learn more about the cultural diversity of our planet. If there’s anything we’ve learned in the past year and a half, it’s that the Sun Devils are resilient and can accomplish anything, no matter what the obstacles or where they are.

Through the lenses of these six interdisciplinary courses offered for the fall semester 2021 at Arizona State University’s School of International Letters and Cultures, students will have the opportunity to learn about the history of early Rome, to explore fascinating cases of cultural diversity and to investigate. race in a transnational framework. These courses will provide students with the knowledge and hands-on learning necessary to flourish in their future careers.

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It is a course that traces the history and literature from the beginning of Rome until the fall of the republic. In addition to primary and secondary documents covering the history of this critical period for Rome, students will have the opportunity to read selections from key authors of Rome’s emerging literary culture (Plautus, Cicero, Catullus, etc.).

Greco-Roman culture is a big part of the heritage and tradition of Western civilization, but the creation and evolution of the Roman Republic is one of the most overlooked stories of antiquity. Paraphrasing the great ancient Greek historian Polybius, who studied this period, “Who would not be fascinated to know in what form of constitution Rome became the dominant power in the known world?”

There is no prerequisite for “Rome before the Empire”; this is an excellent upper division course for a faculty, general study designations, etc. If you are interested in Roman history, literature and culture, this will be a great choice. And if you are a major of the classics, this is an essential course for your major.

Faculty teaching this course: Paul Arena, lecturer at the School of International Letters and Cultures

SLC 212 “Language and culture shock”

This asynchronous online course explores fascinating cases of the cultural diversity of our planet and how it is reflected in the languages ​​of the world. We examine how these intercultural and interlinguistic differences affect intercultural communication. The exploration of all these phenomena is done through exchanges with comrades and individual projects addressing concrete cases of global diversity in this field.

As the formidable forces of globalization strive to put us in the shackles of uniform thinking and speaking in one language, exploring and cultivating cultural and linguistic diversity has dual significance. First of all, it reveals a fascinating and multi-colored world of difference, to which each language and culture contributes with its own lens of looking at the world. Second, it develops intercultural sensitivity, which facilitates intercultural communication.

While this course is open to all students interested in gaining an overview of world cultures and languages ​​and the differences between them, it is of particular interest to career paths that involve global engagement. These career paths include, but are not limited to, engineering, business, journalism, political science, world studies, sustainability, and history, as well as language and literature studies. You can meet designations in the Humanities, Social Behavioral Sciences, and General Studies by taking this course.

Faculty teaching this course: Danko Šipka, teacher of Slavic languages ​​and applied linguistics at the School of International Letters and Cultures

ARB 294 “Arab cultures in a world perspective”

This course will increase students’ knowledge of Arab culture, fostering awareness and understanding of customs, values, attitudes and cultural differences that may differ from their own experience and / or cultural background. Using a wide range of readings, popular music, documentaries, films and art, this course harnesses multimedia and everyday life to approach the subject from a global and local perspective. Topics covered will include the Arab family, art and music, food, gender identities, religious life, political conflict and war, Islamic tradition and exile and immigration.

Arab cultural, religious and social customs influence many cultures around the world. This course has been designed for the curious and will explore key elements of Arab culture in context. During the semester, you will discover:

This course offers a deep and broad introduction to Arab culture in its context, with an emphasis on its connection to conditions in the world. Sign up and broaden your understanding of Arab culture by placing it in a global perspective.

Faculty teaching this course: Miral Mahgoub, Associate Professor of Modern Arabic Literature at the School of International Letters and Cultures

Human Sciences Laboratory HUL / SLC / FRE 494 and 598: “Deconstructing the race”

This “Deconstruction of Race” humanities lab will study the category of race in a transnational framework, examining various geographic and historical manifestations of race in relation to social, economic, political and cultural practices. By examining various colonial heritages, philosophical texts and works of art, this laboratory will encourage reflection and interpretation of language and the idea of ​​race in order to understand the different experiences of racialized populations and communities, with the explicit aim of promoting a more inclusive vision. of humanity for the 21st century. Watch the lab trailer here.

All Humanities Labs address pressing social challenges that affect local and global communities today, and this lab is no exception. Students taking this course have the opportunity to engage with community partners and other students from around the world, including those from Europe, Africa and Latin America, in a co-learning experience. to deconstruct the race and its manifestations in other parts of the world. The course encourages students to become active learners, inviting them to ask new research questions on racial (in) justice, to conduct collaborative transdisciplinary research, to engage in open dialogues with multiple stakeholders and to develop results intended for the public. All of this is important because it offers a dynamic opportunity to be part of the solution in real time.

The “Deconstructing Race” lab is designed for undergraduates and graduates of all majors who are interested in exploring racialization and its many global manifestations. The Humanities Lab believes that people with diverse academic backgrounds and cultural perspectives broaden the foundation for finding productive solutions. And logistically, this lab also offers general studies credits in the humanities, general education general awareness credits, and automatic honors credits to Barrett Honors students.

Faculty teaching this course: Isaac Joslin, Assistant Professor of French at the School of International Letters and Cultures, and Yeukai Mlambo, Director of Mastercard Foundation Digital Initiatives at ASU EdPlus and Research Assistant Professor at Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College

JPN 394 “Religion, Philosophy and Culture in Japan”

This course examines the influence of Japanese religions on Japanese values, culture, and society while examining the main religious traditions of premodern and modern Japan, with a focus on Shinto, Buddhism, and new religions. The course will also explore religious practices in Japan and how religion interacts with government, community groups, and people’s daily lives. Generally speaking, Japan has many unique cultural characteristics that are very different from American culture. It is essential to learn theoretical information about these sources if not to see them directly – because people cannot realize their cultural identities without comparing them to others. This course offers students such an opportunity to self-reflect on their cultural background by studying Japanese religions and philosophies.

This course is suitable for all levels of students interested in the humanities.

Faculty teaching this course: Eiji Suhara, Japanese professor at the School of International Letters and Cultures

SLC / HST 214 “The game in the world: history and culture of football”

This course provides a study of the cultural significance and global reach of football, both historically and in contemporary culture. Students study materials from around the world in several mediums; they watch films that explore the cultural impact of play; read literary works focusing on football; and interact with scholarly articles and contemporary gaming news media. The course provides a comprehensive overview of the history, personalities, rivalries, fandom and even finances and scandals related to global gaming.

There are a number of reasons why students should take this course – first and foremost it is a great option and a great experience. There is no other sport in the world with the deeply rooted cultural relevance of football. Because every region and nation of the world has its own unique ‘flavor’ in the way the game is played and enjoyed, and as players and competitions engage across these cultural boundaries, football combines a common thread (the game and its rules) with global diversity (national competitions against the UEFA Champions League, Men’s and Women’s World Cups, etc.). These qualities continue to evolve and must be constantly reassessed, especially in terms of gender and economics. The “world game”, indeed!

“The World’s Game” is a lower level course, but it should appeal to a large base of ASU students. It’s a fun optional course and a great way to get general study requirements. But this is obviously a sine qua non for any student interested in football. The course is structured for all backgrounds and interests in the game. Whether you are an absolute “footy junky” with a lot of football interest or know very little about the history and culture of the sport, this course has much to offer you.

Faculty teaching this course: Enrico Minardi, lecturer in Italian, and Paul Arena, lecturer at the School of International Letters and Cultures


This press release was produced by Arizona State University. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.



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Hershey Montessori School News | Geauga County Maple Leaf https://erudit.media/hershey-montessori-school-news-geauga-county-maple-leaf/ https://erudit.media/hershey-montessori-school-news-geauga-county-maple-leaf/#respond Thu, 27 May 2021 12:07:41 +0000 https://erudit.media/hershey-montessori-school-news-geauga-county-maple-leaf/ The Hershey’s Food Systems Project collaborated on an integrated project across humanities, integrated sciences, and business courses … Food Systems Project The Hershey’s Food Systems Project collaborated on an integrated project across the humanities, integrated sciences, and business courses. Hershey’s grade 10 and 11 students chose a food to research, design / produce and sell […]]]>


The Hershey’s Food Systems Project collaborated on an integrated project across humanities, integrated sciences, and business courses …

Food Systems Project

The Hershey’s Food Systems Project collaborated on an integrated project across the humanities, integrated sciences, and business courses. Hershey’s grade 10 and 11 students chose a food to research, design / produce and sell in local markets.

To support quality production, students learned basic food chemistry and applied the scientific method to improve their products. They also studied the historical, cultural and social justice aspects of their product to strengthen their branding and storytelling.

Students had to calculate the production price and breakeven points to be approved for a microcredit from Hershey Microeconomy; the information was presented to expert guest judges at a “Shark Tank” style event.

As they near the end of the project, they are now focused on building websites, producing and packaging their products. Students will soon attend a local farmer’s market event and set up a booth on the Huntsburg campus to sell their produce and earn funds to pay off their initial loans.

Holding of a panel on gender identity

A roundtable discussion on gender identity formation and ways to support the well-being of our children and adolescents took place on May 25. This presentation followed the morning coffee which took place on April 15th.

Panel presenters included Dr. Vanessa Jensen, Clinical / Pediatric Psychologist, Board-Certified Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychologist at Cleveland Clinic Children’s and Treasurer of the Geauga County SOGI Support Network; Gulnar Feerasta, program director at the Greater Cleveland Gay Bisexual Transgender Lesbian Community Center and LGBTQ + County Board Member of Allies Lake; and Lucy McNees, senior at Hershey Montessori School and co-conspirator of the Huntsburg Student Organization’s Anti-Racism Initiative.



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Stanford launches search for next vice president of the arts https://erudit.media/stanford-launches-search-for-next-vice-president-of-the-arts/ https://erudit.media/stanford-launches-search-for-next-vice-president-of-the-arts/#respond Wed, 26 May 2021 18:30:41 +0000 https://erudit.media/stanford-launches-search-for-next-vice-president-of-the-arts/ This month, Stanford launched the search for a new vice president for the arts with the goal of having the new leader in place by the start of the 2021-2022 academic year. Reporting to the President, the Vice President will represent the arts at the highest levels of government. They will champion the arts as […]]]>


This month, Stanford launched the search for a new vice president for the arts with the goal of having the new leader in place by the start of the 2021-2022 academic year. Reporting to the President, the Vice President will represent the arts at the highest levels of government. They will champion the arts as fundamental to the Stanford experience and the university’s mission and develop strategies to support and amplify the work of arts organizations hosted under the auspices of the Office of the Vice President of the Arts (VPA) .

“The sieve of Eratosthenes” by Mark di Suvero (USA, born in China, 1933), 1999. Stainless steel and paint. (Image credit: LA Cicero)

“We have made great strides in the arts on campus thanks to the Arts Initiative and the incredible energy and enthusiasm of our community,” said Matthew Tiews, associate vice president for the Campus Commitment and Acting Senior Associate Vice President for the Arts, whose responsibility in his interim role includes making recommendations on how best to structure and support artistic activities in the next phase of the VPA. “This is an incredible opportunity to bring in a leader who will take the arts to the next level, especially as our COVID experience has made us understand the importance of human connections and the transcendent experiences that the arts can create.

In the next phase of the VPA, opportunities include increasing commitment to community, social justice and culture change; focusing on the role of the arts in emotional and physical well-being, and connecting the arts to the determined nature of Stanford’s mission and long-term vision.

The Vice President’s Research Committee is co-chaired by Tiews and Srinija Srinivasan, Director and member of the Stanford Live Advisory Council. They are joined by nine committee members representing key groups on and off campus: Lanier Anderson, professor of philosophy and senior associate dean for letters and the arts, School of Humanities and Sciences; Janani Balasubramanian, elder, artist and researcher; Melissa Fetter, chair of the Cantor Arts Center Director’s Advisory Board; Lyndsey Kong, undergraduate and student community liaison for the VPA; Peggy Phelan, professor of English and theater and performance studies, former director of the Stanford Arts Institute; Steve Sano, music teacher and director of the chamber choir and symphonic choir; Martin Shell, vice-president and director of external relations; Vaughn Williams, former director and chairman of the Stanford Arts Advisory Board, and Elizabeth Zacharias, vice president of human resources.

In collaboration with the executive search firm Isaacson, Miller, the search committee will make a recommendation to President Marc Tessier-Lavigne, who will make the final decision.

One of the first responsibilities of the new vice-president will be to finalize the search for the next director of the Cantor Arts Center. A separate committee for this research will be launched soon and is expected to make recommendations to the new vice president in the fall.

The Office of the Vice President for the Arts was established in February 2017 to elevate the arts in the university’s priorities and lead the strategic planning of the university’s artistic goals. Harry Elam, president of Occidental College since 2020, has served as Stanford’s Senior Vice President of Arts, a position he has held while also serving as Senior Vice President for Education and Vice President for undergraduate education. The new senior recruit will be the full-time Senior Vice President for the Arts.

Art programs under the auspices of the APV include the Anderson Collection at Stanford University, the Cantor Arts Center, the Institute for Diversity in the Arts, the Stanford Arts Institute, and Stanford Live. The VPA also operates a central office, which provides operational support for all the units mentioned above, and resources for students and faculty. The academic departments of the arts, including Music, Drama and Performance Studies, Art and Art History, and the English Department’s Creative Writing Program, are all housed at the School of Humanities. The new vice president will work closely with the school and other campus partners to ensure the arts are connected and integrated across the university.



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TRAHC honors the winners of student art exhibitions https://erudit.media/trahc-honors-the-winners-of-student-art-exhibitions/ https://erudit.media/trahc-honors-the-winners-of-student-art-exhibitions/#respond Fri, 21 May 2021 01:21:53 +0000 https://erudit.media/trahc-honors-the-winners-of-student-art-exhibitions/ TEXARKANA, Texas – The Texarkana Regional Council for the Arts and Humanities presented awards to the winning student artists on Sunday, May 16, at an opening reception for the 28th Annual Student Juror Exhibition. The exhibition will be held until June 26 at the Regional Arts Center. Hours of operation are Thursday through Saturday, noon […]]]>


TEXARKANA, Texas – The Texarkana Regional Council for the Arts and Humanities presented awards to the winning student artists on Sunday, May 16, at an opening reception for the 28th Annual Student Juror Exhibition.

The exhibition will be held until June 26 at the Regional Arts Center. Hours of operation are Thursday through Saturday, noon to 4 p.m., at 321 W. 4th St.

The winners are listed below, including the prize awarded, the student’s grade level and the title of their winning work.

Elementary School Division: People’s Choice – Stella Harper, 1st, “Purple Princess”; Award of Merit – Hadlee Kate Pendley, 1st, “Rainbow Town”; Award of Merit – Adriana Cerna, 3rd, “Sunny Fall Day”; Honorable Mention – Aiden Domanski, 2nd, “Backyard Bluebird”; Honorable Mention – Mattie Power, 4th, “A Friendly Game of Cat and Mouse”; 3rd place – Destiny Howard, 4th, “Snowy Sisters”; 2nd place – Huntley Hawkins, 3rd, “A Beautiful Day”; 1st place – Christian Brisco, 4th, “Spring Flowers”; Best of Show – Ava Gray Brisco, 4th, “Looking Up”.

The winners of the elementary students of the 28th Annual Student Jury Exhibition are presented with their prizes. (Photo submitted)

College Division: People’s Choice – Reagan Cranford, 6th, “Nevada Blue Jay”; Award of Merit – Carter Watson, 7th, “You Can Do It”; Award of Merit – Sophia Escobar, 7th, “Whimsical Garden”; Honorable mention – Samantha Stacy, 8th, “Hand Holding Flower”; Honorable Mention – Reagan Cranford, 6th, “Nevada Blue Jay”; 3rd place – Lizzie Sharp, 7th, “Hidden Emotions”; 2nd place – Oviya Justin, 8th, “Inspired Portrait of Aubrey”; 1st place – Gloria Lovelace, 8th, “3 of Me”; Best of Show – Meraldin Medina, 8th, “Salut”.

High School Division: People’s Choice – Jackson Walthall, 12th, “Ford f350 Cab”; Award of Merit – Grace Hughes, 12th, “Heal Your Inner Child”; Award of Merit – Mason Burrow, 12th, “Mileage”; Honorable mention – Iris Rivera, 12th, “Held Back”; Honorable mention – Erica Zofcin, 9th, “Crows”; 3rd place – Leslie A. Reyes, 11th, “Puntada Roja”; 2nd place – Anna Johnson, 11th, “far behind”; 1st place – Ruby Rehkopf, 9th, “Multiple Perspectives”; Best of Show – Emma Sanderson, 12th, “Imprisoned”.



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ARTS AND HUMANITIES: The museum presents meditative paintings | Characteristics https://erudit.media/arts-and-humanities-the-museum-presents-meditative-paintings-characteristics/ https://erudit.media/arts-and-humanities-the-museum-presents-meditative-paintings-characteristics/#respond Fri, 21 May 2021 01:00:00 +0000 https://erudit.media/arts-and-humanities-the-museum-presents-meditative-paintings-characteristics/ Since 2020, we’ve all had a lot of time to get in touch with our inner selves. One of the few benefits of any period of self-isolation, including a lockdown necessitated by a public health crisis, is the opportunity it provides for introspection. Meditative practice, however, is not new. It’s as old as human history. […]]]>


Since 2020, we’ve all had a lot of time to get in touch with our inner selves. One of the few benefits of any period of self-isolation, including a lockdown necessitated by a public health crisis, is the opportunity it provides for introspection.

Meditative practice, however, is not new. It’s as old as human history. The ancient Greeks practiced “omphaloskepsis” or “the navel”, and the concept is familiar to countless other people who view yoga as a means of raising individual consciousness.

Don Cooper’s art, currently on display in a special exhibition at the Morris Museum of Art, prompts us to look above the navel. The 14 paintings currently on display focus on what is known in Sanskrit as the ‘bindu’, which in the practices of Tantric Hinduism and Buddhism manifests itself in the human body at a point at the back of the body. head. Since the bindu is considered the starting point of creation, it is no wonder that over the centuries it has become a focal point of meditation. In Cooper’s work, he also serves as a point of reference for artistic creation.

Informed by the Atlanta-based artist’s trip to India, each of Morris’s bindu paintings is made up of a series of concentric circles radiating from a central point. Whether in oil or acrylic on canvas or watercolor on handmade Indian paper, these works vibrate with energy. By focusing their gaze on the pinpoint at the center of each composition, the viewer will soon notice that the radiating circles within the circles begin to vibrate and merge, roughly mimicking the universal meditative “journey” from the outside to the inside. . In essence, it can be said that Cooper’s bindu paintings serve as “road maps” to introspection.

The decision to mount these works in the small gallery next to the entrance to the museum’s first floor was a stroke of genius. I remembered as I was sitting on the bench in the middle of the exhibition space – and I don’t think this comparison is too far-fetched – a visit I made to the iconic Rothko Chapel in Houston, Texas a few years ago. . This peculiar spiritual space, designed some fifty years ago by one of the greatest abstract painters of the last century, features 14 large-scale color field paintings – the same number of works as in the gallery dedicated to Cooper’s work in Augusta.

In the case of Mark Rothko’s works in Houston, seven are essentially black rectangles on a brown background and seven are variations of the color purple. At the center of the non-denominational space are benches and mats for silent contemplation, for looking outward at the works themselves – Rothko himself felt that the color values ​​in his dark paintings expressed various emotions. human – and to look within.

Cooper paints are intended to perform much the same function. Those whose center is dominated by warm colors advance towards the viewer; those where cold colors predominate recede; but whatever their relative intensity, we are drawn into the vortex, the swirling center of energy skillfully constructed from oil, acrylic, or water.

For more information on this exhibit, on view until August 1, visit themorris.org.



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Podcast ‘A Matter of Facts’: Marcus Funk and podcasts https://erudit.media/podcast-a-matter-of-facts-marcus-funk-and-podcasts/ https://erudit.media/podcast-a-matter-of-facts-marcus-funk-and-podcasts/#respond Fri, 21 May 2021 00:25:19 +0000 https://erudit.media/podcast-a-matter-of-facts-marcus-funk-and-podcasts/ In a world with Facebook, Twitter, 24/7 news channels, radio, citizen journalism, fake news, real news, the public is drowning in an overwhelming information overload. Clearly, a guide is needed to identify what is a trustworthy and reliable source of news and information. Delaware Humanities Podcast – A matter of facts – looks at this […]]]>


In a world with Facebook, Twitter, 24/7 news channels, radio, citizen journalism, fake news, real news, the public is drowning in an overwhelming information overload. Clearly, a guide is needed to identify what is a trustworthy and reliable source of news and information.

Delaware Humanities Podcast – A matter of facts – looks at this topic as part of its mission to engage, educate and inspire all Delawarians through cultural programs. In Season 2 of the podcast, he takes a closer look at popular sources of news and information.

This week on The Green, we bring you the last episode of A matter of facts, with a podcast conversation with Marcus Funk of Sam Houston State University.

Funk is an associate professor of mass communication at Sam Houston State. His research focuses on community and online journalism, and he has written about the role of podcasts in these contexts.

Delaware Public Media is proud to produce A matter of facts with Delaware Humanities, a state affiliated with the National Endowment for the Humanities. Its mission is to engage, educate and inspire all Delawarians through cultural programs.

Delaware Humanities also thanks the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for its generous support of this initiative and the Pulitzer Prizes for its partnership.



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Piedimonte thinks he would bring something different to FSU https://erudit.media/piedimonte-thinks-he-would-bring-something-different-to-fsu/ https://erudit.media/piedimonte-thinks-he-would-bring-something-different-to-fsu/#respond Thu, 20 May 2021 23:45:08 +0000 https://erudit.media/piedimonte-thinks-he-would-bring-something-different-to-fsu/ Dr. Giovanni Piedimonte told attendees at Florida State University (FSU) Presidential Candidates Forums that he brought something different to FSU. He said he brought what FSU was lacking – 30 years in specific environments such as biomedical, engineering, advanced computing, artificial intelligence and environmental science, which he said are insufficient at FSU. “I’ve been in […]]]>



Dr. Giovanni Piedimonte told attendees at Florida State University (FSU) Presidential Candidates Forums that he brought something different to FSU.

He said he brought what FSU was lacking – 30 years in specific environments such as biomedical, engineering, advanced computing, artificial intelligence and environmental science, which he said are insufficient at FSU.

“I’ve been in these areas my whole life. I specialized in the specific areas where FSU needs to develop, ”he said.

The state of Florida has expressed a desire to move from the top 20 to the top 10 universities in the country. He also aspires to become a member of the prestigious Association of American Universities.

To achieve these goals, the university must focus on areas where federal research funding is shifted, he said.

As Vice President of Research at Tulane since September 2019, Piedimonte has overseen the university’s many research programs and in doing so has brought in millions of research dollars, including funding from the National Institute. of health (NIH).

An internationally renowned pediatric physician, Piedimonte is also a professor of pediatric medicine at Tulane. His pre-Tulane experience includes multiple leadership roles in hospital administration, research and teaching at the Cleveland Clinic as well as positions at Case Western Reserve University, West Virginia State University and as Chief of the pediatric pulmonology at the Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami.

But he assured faculty and students that a more intense effort in areas of FSU’s current weaknesses, does not mean sacrificing areas in which FSU is strong, such as the humanities.

“I’m absolutely not saying that the biomedical is more important than the humanities, absolutely not,” he said. “The goal is to develop areas that need help. Raising more money from NIH will make more money for the university. “

He said that as a physician he believed in the doctrine of “do no harm”. He said that if he became president of the university, he would not interfere with the strong programs of FSU. It will “nurture the core of excellence” and “add the necessary components so that FSU has more resources, more opportunities for its students, a better environment to learn and find jobs.”

Piedimonte said, “The world is changing at an unprecedented rate” and FSU must be positioned for what the world will be like 10 years from now, not just where it is now.

He said his approach was a lot like that of hockey legend Wayne Gretskey who said, “Don’t look at where the puck is, but where the puck will be.

Piedimonte also strongly believes in what he calls the “incubator system” where universities and businesses come together. He said it helps with funding and helps students find jobs after graduation.

Moreover, he thinks it is the job of the university rector to work with those of all political persuasions. “I think the president’s job is to be able to reach across the aisle to basically coagulate all the resources that can be acquired for college and bring the bacon home, frankly,” he said.

Piedimonte said one of his first meetings, if he was chosen as the new FSU president, would be with the governor Ron DeSantis to discuss what the State of Florida expects from the FSU and what the FSU can count on from the Legislature.

He believes that this leadership role involves “being able to talk to all the parties that can help your institution”. He said he was open to talking with anyone who can help improve FSU.

Piedimonte also expressed a desire to meet with the chief of the Seminole tribe to thank him for the tribe’s support to the university.

Piedimonte said the job of the president of the university, in a nutshell, is to represent FSU – from fundraising, to bringing technological advancements to the university, to working with students, faculty. and the state legislature.

“We are all here because we dream of a better world,” he said.

He said if he was selected he would “give his last drop of blood” for college.

The other two finalists from nine candidates interviewed by the university’s presidential research advisory committee are Richard mccullough, vice-provost for research at Harvard University and Robert blouin, Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost of the University of North Carolina.

Each of the finalists took part in one-day forums that kicked off Tuesday with McCullough, Bloutin Wednesday and Piedimonte today.



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Headstone dedication for Civil War Union graves – the Tribune https://erudit.media/headstone-dedication-for-civil-war-union-graves-the-tribune/ https://erudit.media/headstone-dedication-for-civil-war-union-graves-the-tribune/#respond Mon, 17 May 2021 04:07:57 +0000 https://erudit.media/headstone-dedication-for-civil-war-union-graves-the-tribune/ More than a century after their deaths, two Civil War Union soldiers were buried in anonymous graves at the late WD Kelley Cemetery in Ironton. However, thanks to the Lytle Camp Project Committee, they will now have gravestones, which will be dedicated in a ceremony on Saturday, May 29. The cemetery is adjacent to US […]]]>


More than a century after their deaths, two Civil War Union soldiers were buried in anonymous graves at the late WD Kelley Cemetery in Ironton.

However, thanks to the Lytle Camp Project Committee, they will now have gravestones, which will be dedicated in a ceremony on Saturday, May 29.

The cemetery is adjacent to US Route 52, just northwest of the Route 141 exit.

Pvt. John Evans, is the great-great-grandfather of Lawrence McCullough, camp chaplain for the Camp Lytle Project Committee.

Evans, who served in C Company, 27th US Colored Infantry, died after the war on September 1, 1904.

Pvt. Jefferson Finley is McCullough’s great-great-great-uncle and Evans’s brother-in-law.

Finley, who served in B Company, 27th US Colored Infantry, died Jan.5, 1887.

The 27th US Colored Infantry was organized at Camp Delaware, Ohio from January 16, 1864 and was active until September 21, 1865. It was one of two black regiments raised primarily in Ohio. They had a distinguished and honorable record of service during the last year of the war. Their honor roll shows 18 combat deaths and 149 hospital deaths as a result of illnesses or injuries received in combat.

The agenda for the program is as follows:

• 2:00 p.m. – Commemoration ceremony at WD Kelly cemetery

• 3:00 pm – Guest speaker, Dr. Kelly D. Mezurek, will present at the Armory Smokehouse in the Banquet / Meeting Room.

Mezurek is professor of history at Walsh University and author of the book “In Their Own Cause: America’s 27th Color Troops.” As it turns out, Mezurek has ancestors from Ironton and Lawrence County and has a great-great-great-grandfather, George LeMasters, who served in the 13th WV Infantry and was killed in the war.

• 4 pm-6pm – The banquet / meeting is reserved for food and drinks. Customers can order from the menu at their own expense.

All events are free and open to the public. Reservations are strongly recommended for the guest speaker and meals in the Armory Smokehouse’s private room. If the room is full, due to COVID-19 restrictions, no one else can be admitted. To make a reservation, please send an email to dsfreeman@fuse.net with name, phone number, email address and number of guests.

Funding for this part of the program was made possible by Ohio Humanities, a state affiliated with the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Donations to support this specific project and program can be made to “Lytle Camp No. 10, SUVCW”, with “Grave Marking 2021” on the memo line, and mailed to: James H. Houston, Treasurer, PO Box 386 , Milford, OH 45150

The Camp Lytle Project Committee is made up of Dennis M. Brown, Camp Photographer, Former Camp Commander, D. Scott Freeman, Camp Patriotic Instructor, and Lawrence McCullough, Camp Chaplain and Descendant.



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Ithaca College mourns sudden death of sophomore athlete https://erudit.media/ithaca-college-mourns-sudden-death-of-sophomore-athlete/ https://erudit.media/ithaca-college-mourns-sudden-death-of-sophomore-athlete/#respond Sun, 16 May 2021 21:57:04 +0000 https://erudit.media/ithaca-college-mourns-sudden-death-of-sophomore-athlete/ Ithaca College says support services are available to members of the campus community following the “sudden death on Saturday of Thomas Fine, a sophomore student specializing in architectural studies at our School of Humanities and Sciences According to a message Saturday from President Shirley. Mr. Collado and Vice President of Student Affairs and Campus Life […]]]>


Ithaca College says support services are available to members of the campus community following the “sudden death on Saturday of Thomas Fine, a sophomore student specializing in architectural studies at our School of Humanities and Sciences According to a message Saturday from President Shirley. Mr. Collado and Vice President of Student Affairs and Campus Life Rosanna Ferro.

The sophomore athlete from Hauppage, New York, was a pole vaulter for the Bombers’ men’s track team.

“On behalf of the entire IC community, we offer our deepest condolences to Thomas’s family, friends, teachers, classmates, teammates and all affected by his passing,” Saturday’s post said. “Please keep Thomas and his loved ones in your thoughts and prayers. As we celebrate the end of the academic year, we ask that you continue to look after each other. “

“Information on memorial services will be shared with the campus community when available,” they add. “In the meantime, please take care of yourself and each other, and keep Thomas and his family close to your heart as we mourn this terrible loss.

College Says: Support services for students are available through the Ithaca College Center for Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) by calling 607-274-3136. Students in need of immediate assistance should contact the Public Security Bureau at 607-274-3333 or residential life staff on duty. Faculty and staff can access Employee Assistance Program (EAP) counseling services by calling 1-800-327-2255. The Office of Religious and Spiritual Life has a dedicated website for bereavement resources and can also provide support by contacting Hierald Osorto, Director of Religious and Spiritual Life, at hosorto@ithaca.edu.

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